NEPTUNE

A COLLABORATION BETWEEN AN ARTIST AND WRITER ‘NEPTUNE’, 2016.

ST IVES, HELSTON AND PORTHLEVEN, CORNWALL.

LIVE PERFORMANCE (CORNWALL, VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEPTEMBER, 2016)

FILM PREMIERE (BATH, JANUARY 2017)

ARTIST (HANNAH BALL) AND WRITER (OLIVER HARROP).

The project was arranged separately from the ‘provenance’ residency that the university arranged.  This collaboration was formed as a result of this residency. It brought together creatives from different fields and I enjoyed the working alongside a writer. I decided to further this idea which was taken from the initial site visit (‘provenance’ in 2016), to a more specific collaborative piece with an artist and writer. The work itself was a live performance and documented as a film. The plot was created and written by Oliver Harrop and narrated by actors, the roles were then acted by London actors, whom we hired, for a week long residency. My role as the artist was to film and edit the footage, to create a narrative based film from a contemporary art perspective. Whilst using the narrative of the film as a starting point. 

IMAGES OF THE FILMING AND FILM STILLS…

REFLECTION

I really enjoyed working on this project, I saw it as a good way to network alongside collaborating with people outside the field in which I am so isolated in the studio. This collaboration has instigated my want to do further collaborations with other professionals, such as scientists, dancers and engineers. I find that this experience has taught me key skills for working together with others. I have learnt to negotiate ideas, ensure that everyone involved in the collective is well informed and aware of what is going on. I have also learnt that it is important to talk through ideas as a group, in order to make them the best that they can be.

I have enjoyed working with a writer. It has been a very different project to the projects that I have been used to working on, on my own in the studio. The idea that the work was already made at the start of the project, in the form of a script, made the project less moveable and adaptable to change. However, problems arose during the project, such as changing actors on the last minute, we then had to adapt the script to meet their needs. However, the narrative was the basis to the project, which we found to be a very productive way of working, as it made sure that there was progression and movement throughout the making of the film. Due to the short time on the residency to film, I have to ensure that we had a productive and well planned time schedule, to ensure that all of the scenes were filmed. The plot has 3 scenes and 15 chapters, some of these were down to the weather forecast (again areas in which I had to rearrange the scripts). We spent a week filming and after each day myself and Oliver Harrop read through the script and watching the footage of the filming, to ensure that nothing had been missed out, and I backed it up, ready for the editing back in my studio in Bath. 

I was incharge of hiring the equipment for the residency and ensuring that we had spare equipment, due to the nature of the project, being completely reliant on technology, things were inevitably going to go wrong. I duplicated the equipment (video cameras, lighting units and tripods) to ensure that this did not happen. 

The filming during the residency, attracted many viewers, due to the nature of the locations that the film was being shot in. There were people in the background of the film and they acted as the extras for the film. Locations included the forest, by and in lakes, on the beach, in the sea and in a grade listed building.

The film was edited and shown during a film premiere at Newton Park, in the tv and film studios, in January 2017. There were 29 guests at the film premiere and we hope to do more premieres in different locations and enter it into short film screenings in the future.